NotaBene

Executive's Guide to Google+: Notable PostsThese links have been carefully selected as some of the best I have encountered from the best sources. I have read them carefully and added extended comments.

Check this page to get our strategic take on enterprise- and executive-relevant innovation using Google+. Items under the “News” tab are more general and numerous.

Notable Google+ Posts, Articles and Research
Backlash against Google/Google+, this post shows how to 1) how to disconnect Google+ from Google search results and 2) configure your browser to default to non-Google search engines. Useful, but assumes 2 things that will be untrue for some people: a) Google+ results "pollute" search results in all cases; b) Yahoo/Bing give better search results. Although all of the above could be true in some cases, the devil is in the details. It is surprising that the post didn't mention a much better alternative: info.com, whose algorithm sorts results from all three search engines. Executive's Guide recommends being aware of the ground shifting under search. Don't get caught up in religious wars, and try different things. As we have argued in these pages here, Google+ results will enhance certain kinds of searches and will return inferior results in others. As infoworld says, users can "filter out" Google+ search results on a case-by-case basis, so the watchword is to try different things. Also, get acquainted with info.com, it could add serious value in some use cases/situations. If you really want "quality" in terms of what you're trying to accomplish, Google+ has made it more complicated. C'est la vie, quoi! ;^(
Useful hacks and explanation: explains Google's slowness with making API available, which keeps Google+ disconnected from the rest of the ecosytem and frustrates users. This imposes a high cost of use because users are only able to post from Google+. Since it delays the adoption of Google+, it's bound to frustrate Google, too, which is a good thing! (we're in alignment ;^)
Useful riff on disruptive potential of Google+ nonetheless has glaring holes and reflects arbitrary assumptions. I recommend reading it to learn about this argument, which is based on this questionable logic: "social data degrades the 'quality' of search results." The real answer is far less satisfying, "It depends." Some search results will be improved with social data while others won't. Search, SEO/SEM and other players dislike Google+ when it disrupts their businesses. Expect, and listen to, these arguments, but realize that they are often biased.
Google spinning up Google+'s developer ecosystem. As I've written from the beginning, Google is playing the long game here; it's obvious that an inordinate amount of WordPress's Facebook's and Twitter's strengths and value has come from their APIs and developer communities (they're all platform plays from this perspective), and Google is taking its time, experimenting. They are executing very well and have time to do it right. Monitor this carefully, the functionality will accelerate. Google may also be taking some lessons from LinkedIn and how they have used an extremely controlled approach to their developer community. Google is also feeling the pain of the chaotic (according to some) Android developer community. A lot of lessons they may be considering.
VentureBeat interviews Brad Horowitz on the strategy for Google+ and on his reaction to journalists and bloggers. Although he's coy about the strategy's specifics, he verified that Google+ was never conceived as a social network; rather it's a way to personalize and glue together users' experiences with all other Google products. There's also an explicit attempt to learn from their own and others' mistakes in terms of user experience; for example, various products (i.e. Plus Gmail Search Docs Blogger..) will enable different identity choices: realname, anonymous, pseudonymous). In this, Google's endgame is similar to Facebook's: to provide advertisers a better picture of user wishes so they can advertise more effectively. I still stand by my assertion that Google+ will change the context and pressure social networks in unusual ways, so I'll be following it closely. But don't think of it as a social network to begin seeing its disruptive potential.
Short post on the significance of the integration of Google+ and Google Apps - and how to migrate your Google+ presence from a personal Google account to a Google Apps account in order to use Google Apps' arsenal of online tools, for photo editing and many others.
Useful post gives ten bite-sized tips for how to use Google+ that reflect its ongoing development and satisfy your instant gratification hacker. A sampling: how to search Google+ content (no official search available), how to italicize, bold & strikethrough text, how to do the equivalent of bookmarking within G+ and how to reorder Circles.
Wired interview with Brad Horowitz, Google's VP of Products offers valuable insight into how Google perceives Google+. This shows why it's a mistake to consider "Plus" just another social network. Google wants to make it the central hub of digital content sharing. One interesting insight: much of the "sharing" on Google+ is private, unlike in Twitter and Facebook, so it isn't visible to the public. This makes it difficult for pundits to correct its adoption. I predict that Google+ will disrupt the concept of "social networks" significantly and raise the bar in numerous areas. It is extremely significant when you reflect on Horowitz's remarks and what Google does.
Must read post speculating on whether Google will integrate Google+ with Docs to make an enterprise play, disrupting Yammer, Socialtext and other lightweight social enterprise players. This is exactly how to think and why most people miss the true significance of Google+: it's a social infrastructure into which users will be able to plug many of their other Web activities (such as using Google Docs, Gmail, Payments, etc.). This makes it far more significant that "another social network." Thx @jowyang #fb

More Notable Google+ Posts

1 comment to NotaBene

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>